Vermont travel guide

is the second smallest state in terms of population (it has 626,431 residents) and the sixth smallest in geographic area. Lake Champlain, the nation’s sixth-largest freshwater body lies at the northwest border with New York State and Canada. The state is split east-west by the Green Mountains, which are popular for recreational activities. The eastern border with New Hampshire is defined by the Connecticut River. Vermont is the only landlocked state in New England which often leads to it being short-changed in guides to the region. Its highest point is Mount Mansfield at 4,393 ft, and its lowest point is Lake Champlain, at 95 feet.

 

The state is extremely rural, its valleys littered with farms. Its largest city is Burlington, pop. 42,417. Among the state’s major exports are cheese, maple syrup, marble, slate, and granite. is also a very large industry in Vermont, as skiers travel from Boston, New York, Canada, and elsewhere to ski resorts up and down the Green Mountain spine during the winter. In summer, the many bed and breakfasts fill up with couples and families wanting to visit the state’s small towns and wild areas. Vermont’s autumn foliage is known for being the most spectacular in the country, and possibly the world. It occurs quite early — usually mid-September to mid-October. The only time that the visitor might try to plan around is “Mud Season” (March-April), when unpaved ground becomes undriveable during the thaw. Even Mud Season has its charms, though.

 

Vermont was the 14th state admitted to the United States. It was not among the original 13 colonies because of a border dispute between New Hampshire and New York which was originally resolved in New York’s favor. Vermont residents, led by Ethan Allen and his Green Mountain Boys, fought New York’s land claims tooth and nail until declaring independence and soon thereafter being admitted to the union. Vermont attracted settlers during the early nineteenth century, but population remained stagnant as flatter land to the West grew in favor. Significantly deforested by upland sheep farming during the 1800s, the forest has regrown (now covering 80% of the state) since dairy became the predominant form of agriculture. Vermont’s urban areas have always been minuscule compared to the Northeast; the rural state, once seen as the most conservative in the nation, is now considered politically independent, progressive and protective of its environment and rural character. Outside Chittenden County and larger towns like Montpelier, however, a more conservative mindset survives.

 

The Appalachian Mountains that enfold Vermont were most likely created during the Taconic Orogeny, when the North American plate collided with the African plate approximately 550 to 440 million years ago. The mountains have subsequently been eroded by ice, water, and wind, such that they are rather humble in their current state (they are suspected of having reached the heights of the Himalayas). Today Vermont is home to many wild habitats and their constituent flora and fauna, including northern deciduous forests, coniferous forests, wetlands, farmlands, powerline greenways, and patches of tundra (most notably on Mount Mansfield). Notable fauna include the black bear, moose, and the pileated woodpecker.

 

Vermont [1] is in the New England region of the United States. The Green Mountain State is known for its beautiful fall foliage and its maple syrup. It is a popular destination for hiking and skiing.

 

 

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